TPatT - Titles

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100 Years of Contact
100 Years of Contact
"Historically, the Shuswap people lived a good life. They lived in harmony with the land, using nature in a way which would not result in damage to the environment. Respect for the land ws shown through conservation. Birch bark was only taken in the spring, when the outer bark could be removed without killing the tree. when animals were taken for food and clothing, nothing was wasted. During the year, the Shuswap followed a seasonal cycle. In the spring, fish were caught and berries were picked. Late summer saw all the communities fishing along the Fraser and Thompson Rivers. While the youth speared or netted the salmon, the older men went to the mountians to hunt moose and deer. The balanced lifestyle depended on traditional Indian skills and knowledge handed down through the ages by word of mouth. This all changed with the appearance of the fur traders, missionaries, gold miners and settlers." taken from the provided introduction, p. 7.
A Short History of Indians in Canada
A Short History of Indians in Canada
Acclaimed author Thomas King is in fabulous, fantastical form in this bestselling short story collection. From the surreal migrations of the title story to the misadventures of Coyote in the modern world and the chaos of a baby's unexpected arrival by airmail, King's tales are deft, hilarious and provocative. A National Post and Quill & Quire bestseller, and an Amazon.ca Top Pick for 2005, A Short History of Indians in Canada is a comic tour de force.
A Tortured People
A Tortured People
This book grew out of the experiences of life and political struggle under colonization in Métis and other Aboriginal communities in Canada. It provides a uniquely Aboriginal socio-political perspective on the effects of colonization on Aboriginal peoples in Canada. It also presents a fresh outlook on decolonization and contemporary Aboriginal life and culture. Tortured People explains the deeply rooted issues behind the dramatic increase in Aboriginal militant action in recent years.
A story as sharp as a knife: the classical Haida mythtellers and their world
A story as sharp as a knife: the classical Haida mythtellers and their world
"First published by the University of Nebraska Press in 1999. The text of this edition follows the second edition published by Douglas & McIntyre in 2011, with minor emendations"--Verso of title page Issued in case, Prologue: Reading what cannot be written -- [Part] 1. Sghwaansing. 1. Goose food ; 2. Spoken music ; 3. The one they hand along ; 4. Wealth has big eyes ; 5. Oral tradition and the individual talent -- [Part] 2. Sting. 6.The anthropologist and the dogfish ; 7. Who's related to whom? ; 8. The epic dream ; 9. The shaping of the canon ; 10. The flyting of Skaay and Xhyuu -- [Part] 3. Hlghun'uhl. 11. You are that too ; 12. Sleek blue beings ;13. The iridescent silence of the trickster ; 14. The lastpeople in the world -- [Part] 4. Stansing. 15. A knife that could open its mouth ; 16. The historian of Ttanuu ; 17. Chase what's gone -- [Part] 5. Tliihl. 18. A blue holein the heart ; 19. The prosody of meaning ; 20. Shellheap of the spirit-beings ; 21. 1 November 1908 ; 22. How the town mother's wife became the widow of her husband's sister's sons -- Political afterword -- Appendix 1: Spelling, pronunciation and Native American typography -- Appendix 2: Haida geography and village names -- Appendix 3: The structure of Skaay's Raven travelling : the poem ofthe elders, OCLC: 926983506
Aboriginal peoples in Canadian cities: transformations and continuities
Aboriginal peoples in Canadian cities: transformations and continuities
Transformations and Continuities: An Introduction Urban Life: Reflections of a Middle-Class Indian / Craig Proulx / Heather A. Howard Nomadic Legacies and Contemporary Decision-Making Strategies between Reserve and City / David R. Newhouse Papaschase Band: Building Awareness and Community in the City of Edmonton / Regna Darnell "Regaining the childhood I should have had": The Transformation of Inuit Identities, Institutions, and Community in Ottawa / Jaimy L. Miller Friendship Centre: Native People and the Organization of Community in Cities / Lynda Brown / Julie-Ann Tomiak / Donna Patrick / Heidi Langille / Mihaela Vieru Neoliberalism and the Urban Aboriginal Experience: A Casino Rama Case Study / Heather A. Howard Challenges to and Successes in Urban Aboriginal Education in Canada: A Case Study of Wiingashk Secondary School / Darrel Manitowabi Critical Discourse Analysis of John Stackhouse's "Welcome to Harlem on the Prairies" / Sadie Donovan Urban Aboriginal Gangs and Street Sociality in theCanadian West: Places, Performances, and Predicaments of Transition / Craig Proulx "Why Is My People Sleeping?": First Nations Hip Hop between the Rez and the City / Kathleen Buddle Plains Indian Ways to Inter-tribal Cultural Healing in Vancouver / Marianne Ignace Contributors / Lindy-Lou Flynn Index / Lindy-Lou Flynn, OCLC: 694268615
All the Gallant Beasts and Monsters
All the Gallant Beasts and Monsters
Catalogue of an exhibition held at the Buschlen Mowatt Fine Arts Gallery.

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