The People and the Text titles

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100 Years of Contact
100 Years of Contact
"Historically, the Shuswap people lived a good life. They lived in harmony with the land, using nature in a way which would not result in damage to the environment. Respect for the land ws shown through conservation. Birch bark was only taken in the spring, when the outer bark could be removed without killing the tree. when animals were taken for food and clothing, nothing was wasted. During the year, the Shuswap followed a seasonal cycle. In the spring, fish were caught and berries were picked. Late summer saw all the communities fishing along the Fraser and Thompson Rivers. While the youth speared or netted the salmon, the older men went to the mountians to hunt moose and deer. The balanced lifestyle depended on traditional Indian skills and knowledge handed down through the ages by word of mouth. This all changed with the appearance of the fur traders, missionaries, gold miners and settlers." taken from the provided introduction, p. 7.
500 essential graphic novels: the ultimate guide
500 essential graphic novels: the ultimate guide
From the Publisher: 500 Essential Graphic Novels is an all-in-one guide to this exciting form of visual literature. Including more than 350 authors and 400 artists, this lush volume contains an essential mix of some of the finest visually-stunning stories of our time. From politically-charged non-fiction sagas to imaginative fantasy tales, this ultimate guide has something to satisfy everyone's taste. The first of its kind, this bookfocuses on each graphic novel separately, honing in on arttechnique, style and prose, plus an age rating system so parents will know what is suitable for their children. Chapters are divided by genre, complete with individual plot synopses and star-scaled reviews for each book, providing the reader with a concise and balanced understanding of today's best graphic novels, Includes indexes, Introduction -- 1: Adventure -- Top 10 adventure graphic novels you must read -- Best of the rest -- 2: Non-fiction -- Top 10 biography, autobiography, and non-fiction graphic novels you must read -- Best of the rest -- 3: Crime and mystery -- Top 10 crime and mystery graphic novels you must read -- Best of the rest -- 4: Fantasy -- Top 10 fantasy graphic novels you must read -- Best of the rest -- 5: General fiction -- Top 10 general fiction novels you must read -- Best of the rest -- 6: Horror -- Top 10 horror graphic novels you must read -- Best of the rest -- 7: Humor -- Top 10 humor graphic novels you must read -- Best of the rest -- 8: Science fiction -- Top 10 science fiction novels you must read -- Best of the rest -- 9: Superheroes -- Top 10 superhero graphic novels you must read -- Best of the rest -- 10: War -- Top 10 war graphic novels you must read -- Best of the rest -- Reference -- Indexes -- Publisher information -- Contributors -- Acknowledgments, OCLC: 179808346
A Short History of Indians in Canada
A Short History of Indians in Canada
Acclaimed author Thomas King is in fabulous, fantastical form in this bestselling short story collection. From the surreal migrations of the title story to the misadventures of Coyote in the modern world and the chaos of a baby's unexpected arrival by airmail, King's tales are deft, hilarious and provocative. A National Post and Quill & Quire bestseller, and an Amazon.ca Top Pick for 2005, A Short History of Indians in Canada is a comic tour de force.
A handbook of critical approaches to literature
A handbook of critical approaches to literature
Getting Started: The Precritical Response Traditional Approaches Formalist Approaches Materialisms Literature and Linguistics The Psychological Approach Mythological and Archetypal Approaches Feminisms and Gender Studies Cultural Studies Postcolonial Studies Andrew Marvell, "To His Coy Mistress" Nathaniel Hawthorne, "Young Goodman Brown" Alice Walker, "Everyday Use" Epilogue Glossary of Literary Terms Index, OCLC: 471822313
A story as sharp as a knife: the classical Haida mythtellers and their world
A story as sharp as a knife: the classical Haida mythtellers and their world
"First published by the University of Nebraska Press in 1999. The text of this edition follows the second edition published by Douglas & McIntyre in 2011, with minor emendations"--Verso of title page Issued in case, Prologue: Reading what cannot be written -- [Part] 1. Sghwaansing. 1. Goose food ; 2. Spoken music ; 3. The one they hand along ; 4. Wealth has big eyes ; 5. Oral tradition and the individual talent -- [Part] 2. Sting. 6.The anthropologist and the dogfish ; 7. Who's related to whom? ; 8. The epic dream ; 9. The shaping of the canon ; 10. The flyting of Skaay and Xhyuu -- [Part] 3. Hlghun'uhl. 11. You are that too ; 12. Sleek blue beings ;13. The iridescent silence of the trickster ; 14. The lastpeople in the world -- [Part] 4. Stansing. 15. A knife that could open its mouth ; 16. The historian of Ttanuu ; 17. Chase what's gone -- [Part] 5. Tliihl. 18. A blue holein the heart ; 19. The prosody of meaning ; 20. Shellheap of the spirit-beings ; 21. 1 November 1908 ; 22. How the town mother's wife became the widow of her husband's sister's sons -- Political afterword -- Appendix 1: Spelling, pronunciation and Native American typography -- Appendix 2: Haida geography and village names -- Appendix 3: The structure of Skaay's Raven travelling : the poem ofthe elders, OCLC: 926983506

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